Alumna flying high in Lockheed Martin engineering career

Daniele Mendez ’19 is a software engineer associate at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics. She received her bachelor’s degree in computer science from Florida Polytechnic University.

As a software engineer associate at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics and an on-air technology host at PLuGHiTz Live, Daniele Mendez ’19 is fulfilling her dreams and pursuing passions for engineering and journalism.

Mendez received her bachelor’s degree in computer science from Florida Polytechnic University in 2019 and joined the aerospace, defense, and technology giant soon after.

“I work for the F-35 ALIS program, which is basically all of the brains of the F-35,” she said, referring to the combat aircraft produced by Lockheed Martin. “It’s been incredible.”

Mendez, a graduate of Sickles High School in Tampa, Florida, said she is constantly learning new skills and information.

“You get the opportunity to learn at this company and they’re aware you may not be aware of all the systems when you’re just starting out,” she said. “They work with you every step of the way.”

Brett Mas, Mendez’s supervisor, said she has become an asset to the company since her arrival in 2019.

“Right way, she found ways to contribute to the team while learning the technical aspects of our software development processes,” said Mas, F-35 ALIS Software Engineering Manager. “She has been eager to learn from her more experienced teammates and takes on all tasking with a positive, learning attitude. She continues to take on more challenging technical implementations within our program.”

In addition to her work at Lockheed Martin, Mendez also has worked as an on-air talent for PLuGHiTz Live, a technology-focused multimedia company based in Largo, Florida, since 2014.

“I love it,” Mendez said. “I get to network and talk with a lot of people, interviewing people with all different backgrounds.”

June 23 is International Women in Engineering Day, which seeks to raise the profile of women in engineering and shine a spotlight on the career opportunities available to them. According to the US Census Bureau, women represent only 15% of those in engineering occupations and about one-quarter of computer workers, including computer and information systems managers.

Mendez, who was vice president of the Society of Women Engineers at Florida Poly, is proud to be among their ranks.

“I want to tell younger women that they can do anything. They can don’t have to go into certain professions,” Mendez said. “I urge women to explore different options while they’re young so they understand more and can see what they like and don’t like.”

“It’s really easy for young women to be discouraged from the STEM fields and I think that should be overcome,” she added.

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